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After Lockdown

05 Jun 2020

As we emerge from lockdown, it has been interesting to observe the various ways in which different businesses have been affected and have adapted.  We’re now seeing some recruitment activity again and have confirmed new starters this month.  Some businesses are on track and staff are fully employed at home. Others, may need to restructure and make redundancies; others are looking to bring furloughed workers back and coordinate new patterns of work within the office and some will be looking to recruit again!

Certainly, it would appear that the UK would have benefited from a swifter move to lockdown in the early stages of the Coronavirus pandemic as the length of lockdown may have been shorter, saved lives and allowed economic activity to resume more quickly.  The continuing partial lockdown is now probably disproportionately affecting the young and the disadvantaged who may be less likely to qualify for government support schemes and may find it harder to gain new employment with some sectors of the economy still in lockdown.

The furlough and self-employed schemes have been impressive.  However, they are not sustainable and if they merely delay redundancies rather than preventing them, they may be disproportionately costly.  If, as planned in the next phase of lifting lockdown, the schemes offer flexibility too, this will help businesses grapple with the complex needs of bringing staff back to work, enable them to respond better to new commercial pressures and maximise efficiency by allowing  staff to do some essential work whilst it may not be viable to bring them back full-time for a little longer.  That may be very helpful in preventing redundancies.

If, you were very unlucky and between jobs at the start of lockdown this may have been an especially hard period.  Alternatively, you may need to start looking for work again.  Over the next weeks we’ll be posting up the jobs that are hiring now or alternatively drop us a CV and let us know what you are looking for.

Sue Payne